Women in Translation Recommendations

As I mentioned in this post, the lovely Jennifer asked you guys to submit Women in Translation recommendations, which we’ve compiled into this post here. We got some really incredible submissions – so enjoy, and read Women in Translation year round! 🙂


Robert Pisani, Malta (The Bobsphere

The Museum of Unconditional Surrender by Dubravka Ugrešić (translated from Croatian by Celia Hawkesworth)

If one looks up a definition of a museum, one will get an explanation on the lines of a building containing artifacts of importance. However technically, going by that definition, every dwelling is a museum of sorts. In The Museum of Unconditional Surrender Ugrešić takes this concept to interesting territories. 

Throughout the novel we readers are presented with pictures and artifacts while the narrator of the book explains their significance to her own personal history , these memories and objects range between quirky to bleak. By the end of the book the reader learns how a personal history, encapsulated in objects, has a way of contributing to events in world history.  I’m a fan of playful narratives and this does not disappoint.


Rachel Matthews, Nottingham, England

Chernobyl Prayer by Svetlana Alexievich (translated from Russian by Anna Gunin and Arch Tait) 

In Chernobyl Prayer, Svetlana Alexievich manages to create beauty out of devastation. She brings together a series of monologues from the people of Chernobyl affected by the 1986 nuclear power plant accident. The choices she makes in how the monologues are structured elevate this from being a simple record of events to something closer to poetry with themes of hope, duty and uncertainty running throughout. The reference to prayer in the book’s title is fitting as those sharing their stories do so without confirmation they will be read, some will die before the book is even published, but they speak anyway in hopes that their sacrifice will not be forgotten. Alexievich has immortalised their words in this wonderful book and it was a truly humbling experience to read.


Kate Carberry

Things We Lost in the Fire by Mariana Enriquez (translated from Spanish by Megan McDowell)

Mariana Enriquez’s Things We Lost in the Fire is a beautiful and chilling short story collection which most definitely warrants a read. Under the shadow of Argentina’s former dictatorship, characters must undergo constant challenges to their values and must negotiate between their morals and their survival. The horror in these stories succeeds because it strikes a balance between the violence visited upon the characters’ bodies and the psychological terror that comes with self-knowledge and experience.


Areeb Ahmad, New Delhi, India (Bankrupt Bookworm)

Father Maybe an Elephant, and Mother Only a Small Basket, But… by Gogu Shyamala (translated from Telugu by Various)

Shyamala’s stories, written in Telugu which is a prominent Indian regional language, are cut from the fabric of her own life and seek to depict the complexity of Dalit experiences. Even though each story has a different translator, overall it’s a translation that mimics and retains the unique flavours of Shyamala’s Telugu, quite distinct from the more standardized version. These stories deal with serious themes like discrimination, caste violence, and emancipation, yet are never pedagogic or heavy-handed. The prose is simple but sensuous, especially in its lush descriptions of nature. Published by an indie press that prides itself on its anti-caste focus, this collection creates marvels out of the mundane, distils the essence of life, and leaves a bit of itself inside the reader.

Breast Stories by Mahasweta Devi (translated from Bengali by Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak)

Mahasweta Devi focused on women’s lives in her writing and explored how a female subaltern is doubly marginalized, first for being female and second for being subaltern (here meaning belonging to a lower caste or class). This micro-collection of three stories centres around the image of breasts to highlight the callous oppression and gross objectification of women through their bodies. During any conflict or war, a woman’s body becomes the primary target of an attack as she is seen as a receptacle of honour and shame by a patriarchal society. Devi explodes this extremely twisted notion in these three stories and shows how a body, especially the female body, can become a site of exertion of authoritarian power as well as of gendered resistance against that power.


Emma Wilson, Canberra, Australia 

Visitation by Jenny Erpenbeck (translated from German by Susan Bernofsky)

In this slim and eerie novel, Erpenbeck tracks the fortunes of one lakeside house in Brandenburg. At first I couldn’t be fully immersed because of how removed the perspective seemed, as the different inhabitants over the course of a century come in and out of focus. But in the end I think that’s the book’s strength: its wider view of a century of massive change for Germany. I loved the idea that places are haunted by disappearances, dispossessions, and repossessions, and how the house itself remains both stoic and affected throughout.


Eric Karl Anderson, London, England (Lonesome Reader)

Love by Hanne Ørstavik (translated from Norwegian by Martin Aitken)

Full review here

There’s an aching feeling of loneliness as well as a foreboding sense of danger throughout Hanne Ørstavik’s short, razor-sharp novel Love. The story concerns Vibeke and her adolescent son Jon who have recently moved to a small town in the north of Norway. Jon is about to turn nine years old, but rather than prepare to celebrate they embark on independent journeys deep into the night meeting strangers and travelling through the freezing near-empty landscape. The narrative continuously switches focus between the mother and son’s points of view without any line breaks or indications that it’s changing. This produces the curious effect of a synchronicity and connection between the two, but, as the novel continues, it becomes apparent there’s a dangerous disconnect between them. Although there’s little plot, a quiet tension hums throughout each section making this a deeply meditative, haunting and curiously mesmerising novel which captures an eerie sense of estrangement from the people we’re supposed to be closest to. 

Soviet Milk by Nora Ikstena (translated from Latvian by Margita Gailitis)

Full review here

Soviet Milk alternates between the perspectives of an unnamed mother and daughter over a number of years from 1969 to 1989. They have a tumultuous relationship with each other and both struggle to find their place in society because this was a period of time when Latvia was still under Soviet rule. The mother is a skilled doctor specializing in female fertility, but finds life in the communist system stiflingly oppressive. Equally the daughter struggles to grow and nurture her developing intellect in such a regimental system. This is a moving and deeply poignant story of an unconventional mother-daughter relationship and a country undergoing radical social change as Latvia regains its independence. It illuminates the distinct personalities of certain characters in how the weight of history impacts them, but also shows a cumulative sense of national identity.


Elena Faverio, Smithtown, New York, United States (Elena Faverio

Fruits Basket by Natsuki Takaya (translated from Japanese by a few different companies and a lot of hardworking fans!)

Fruits Basket is about a young orphan, Tohru Honda, who gets involved with the mysterious Soma family who are suffering under an ancient family curse. Whenever one of the family members is ill, stressed, or embraced by a member of the opposite sex, they transform into one of the animals of the Chinese Zodiac. This was the first ever manga I read (way back in 2007) and it has recently come back into mainstream popularity with a reanimation of the 26-episode anime series (it was first animated in 2001)! It is one of the most popular Japanese manga of all time, with over 18 million copies sold. Fruits Basket is light-hearted, tender, heart-wrenching, and funny in turns–and it’s a great read for young and mature readers alike!


Kamil Lopuch, Warsaw, Poland (What Kamil Reads)

Shielding the Flame by Hanna Krall (translated from Polish by Joanna Stasinska & Lawrence Weschler)

Shielding the Flame if translated word for word from Polish would be titled “To make it before God,” which doesn’t sound as smooth as the former, but illustrates more clearly the doomed fight Krall’s reportage describes.

In the seventies of the last century, Hanna Krall published a series of interviews with Marek Edelman, one of the leaders of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising. Edelman, a man reluctant to talk about the past in a myths-creating manner, in Krall’s reportage, commemorates the ghetto’s insurgents, but he also exposes everyday life during the most dehumanising circumstances.

Those who have never read Holocaust literature, fiction or non-fiction, need to brace themselves for the inhumane imagery of that period. Additionally, this set of interviews alternates between the Ghetto Uprising and the post-war life of Edelman, who became a well-known cardiac surgeon, which might make it a bit harder to follow. However, even though it’s a gut-wrenching read, it is gripping and extremely current too, due to its overarching humanism.


Marek Veselý, Czech Republic

Purge by Sofi Oksanen (translated from Finnish by Lola Rogers)

This book was intense but so good! Aliide is an old woman living alone in Estonia when a Russian girl named Zara shows up on her door, running from some kind of trauma. You learn about both their (very traumatic) backstories, but probably the most memorable thing is the atmosphere. There’s resentment and unspoken pain behind every interaction. And the more you learn about both (especially Aliide) the more sympathies change. Not a book for the faint of heart but definitely well-written and impactful.


Emily Polson, Brooklyn, New York, United States (@emilycpolson)

La Bastarda by Trifonia Melibea Obono (translated from Spanish by Lawrence Schimel)

Set in Central Africa, this coming-of-age novella follows the orphan Okomo whose grandmother has warned her away from befriending a group of young women she considers “indecent and mysterious.” Naturally, Okomo begins spending time with them. When she finds herself falling in love with their leader, she has to decide whether to follow the strict conventions of her Fang culture or rebel and become an outcast alongside her gay uncle. La Bastarda subverts all kinds of cultural norms and western ideas about queer love, community, and identity, which scholar Abosede George does an excellent job of contextualizing in the afterword. It’s also worth noting that this is the first novel by a woman from Equatorial Guinea to be translated into English, making it a landmark addition to the canon of translated literature.

Vagabonds by by Hao Jingfang (translated from Chinese by Ken Liu)

Set in the year 2196, Vagabonds follows a group of young delegates returning to Mars after a five-year cultural exchange on Earth. Mars won the war for independence a hundred years prior, but now escalating tensions between the two planets threaten the peace. After her return, Luoying, a Martian dancer, struggles to reintegrate to her homeland’s collectivistic society after experiencing the independence and creative freedom of life on capitalist Earth. Meanwhile, Eko, a documentary filmmaker from Earth, experiences opposing internal conflicts over his surprising appreciation for Martian society, with its open access to information and non-existent intellectual property laws. The two are vagabonds, stuck between cultures, never to be fully at home again on either planet. It’s easy to think of Mars as representative of China and Earth as Western society, but this meandering, philosophical novel cracks open readers’ assumptions and veers away from simple metaphors. It’s a lengthy tome, but well worth the investment.


Sabrina Unrein, Colorado, United States (bookish sabrina)

Tokyo Ueno Station by Yu Miri (translated from Japanese by Morgan Giles)

Tokyo Ueno Station paints a picture of life in modern-day Tokyo as if observed from a crowded train platform. You may only catch snippets of conversation, the call of a bird as it passes overhead, or a glimpse of an umbrella dripping with rain. These observations are woven together with reflections and ruminations of an unhoused man who later becomes a ghost. Both in life and death, he occupies a park near the Ueno train station and reflects on his life and his surroundings. There is so much to consider in this novel about Japanese history, our legacies, death, and how we treat one another. I really loved it for its brevity and thematic complexity, although its style may deter some readers.

Tender is the Flesh by Augustina Bazterrica (translated from Spanish by Sarah Moses)

This is a novel about a near-future in which people begin breeding and raising humans for consumption. The normalization of cannibalism is blurred and ambiguated through carefully controlled language and a redefinition of what it means to be a person. What makes this novel great is how it goes beyond its premise to examine the power of language, the danger of individualism, and the lengths people will go to in order to get what they want. I don’t consider myself to be a squeamish person, but this novel had my stomach fluctuating between queasy churning and a knotted pit of dread. Tender is the Flesh is a visceral, often unpleasant read that will not appeal to everyone, but I found it quite impactful. I was also grateful that it was relatively short, as I do not know if my constitution could have handled much more body horror.


Laura Frey, Edmonton, Canada (Reading in Bed)

The Bridge of Beyond by Simone Schwarz-Bart (translated from the French by Barbara Bray)

This novel is about the end of slavery on the Caribeean island Guadaloupe and the end of a family line, Télumée being the last of a long line of mothers and daughters. But of course it’s not really the end; the effects of slavery are ongoing, and Télumée is such a vivid, arresting presence that it’s impossible to believe she’ll leave no trace. You may have gathered that this is not a light novel, but the writing and the translation is light, as in airy, and dreamlike. The prose is so effortless and perfect, it’s easy to forget this is a translation, but it’ll also make you want to read in the original French, if you can. 

The Adventures of China Iron by Gabriela Cabezón Cámara (translated from the Spanish by Fiona Mackintosh and Iona Macintyre)

The International Booker Prize isn’t always the most accessible place to start diving into translations. They tend to favour the experimental. This 2020 shortlister probably qualifies, but it’s actually accessible at many levels. Are you familiar with the foundational Argentinian epic poem El Gaucho Martín Fierro? Perfect, this is a satire and you’ll love it. Not so much? That’s fine too, you can relax and enjoyr a drug-fueled romp across the pampas, or get serious and appreciate the sharp post-colonial and feminist critique. Oh, and if you need a 19th century lesbian romance to hold you over till Ammonite is released, China Iron‘s got you covered.


Nicola Balkind, California, United States (robotnic / instagram.com/robotnic)

Four by Four by Sara Mesa (Translated from Spanish by Katie Whittemore)

Insular communities are an excellent setting for gothic stories, and Four by Four is no exception. Set at Wybrany College –– only allegedly established in 1943 –– is an “elite alternative to the orphanages and shelters of the day,” where the wealthy keep their kids away from the rapidly depopulating city of Vado. The “Specials”, those on scholarship, become pets to the elite students; students pets to the masters; and on it goes. Through its short chapters, erratic timeline, and two-part narration the school’s web of exploitation is gradually weaved. Just try to find your footing in this unsettling milieu. 

The Story of My Teeth by Valeria Luiselli (Translated from Spanish by Christina MacSweeney)

Valeria Luiselli’s irreverent second novel in Spanish was written in collaboration with workers at a Jumex factory in Ecatepec. The workers would listen to chapters as they worked, discuss them, and return the recordings of their discussions back to the author. The story follows Gustavo “Highway” Sánchez Sánchez, an auctioneer in Mexico City. His wares? The teeth of notorious and infamous people from Petrarch to Marilyn Monroe. Highway is endearingly eccentric and charming company on this hilarious, madcap journey on which his only aim is to impress his son.


Cara O’Sullivan 

After the Wall by Jana Hensel (translated from German by Jefferson Chase)

This is a memoir about growing up in East Germany, and what it’s like to have childhood experiences that don’t exist anymore. My favorite element is the contrast of generations; older East Germans find it harder to adapt to the change, but younger Germans can’t completely understand what it was like to grow up in a divided country with such different experiences on either side of the wall. Hensel writes in a collective voice to show that she’s speaking for her cohort who have one foot in the past and another in the present. Really recommend this!


Isy Abraham-Raveson, Philadelphia, United States

Pippi Longstocking by Astrid Lingren (translated from Swedish by Florence Lamborn) 

Pippi Longstocking is a joyful story of an unconventional, super-strong girl teaching others the importance of breaking conventions and being oneself. Pippi is wonderfully imperfect. She can be self-centered and is easily annoyed, but also hates injustice and always stands up to bullies, whether they are little boys or police officers. Unfortunately, the book is not free of racism–Pippi is full of strange tales of racialized others from her worldly travels. If sharing this book with children, it would certainly require a discussion about prejudice. But overall, Pippi is a role model for all of us, embodying courage, strength, independence, playfulness, and the power of eccentricity.


Matthew Sciarappa, New York, United States (Matthew Sciarappa)

The Frightened Ones by Dima Wannous (translated from Arabic by Elisabeth Jaquette) 

The Frightened Ones explores the psychological traumas of living under dictatorship in present-day Syria through an intimate look into the pressure-cooked minds of two women. It is an emulsion of reality and memory, blurring storytelling boundaries between an in-person narrator and one in a manuscript. The effect creates a sort of meta-autofiction, where truth is overrun by fear and we as readers are left questioning what is commentary, biography, or fiction. The complexity of Wannous’ text softens its focus, making it hard to describe, but its propulsive pace and meticulous sense of atmosphere make it worth the effort. Ultimately, The Frightened Ones reads less like a novel and more like an experience.


Jennifer Helinek, New York, United States (Insert Literary Pun Here)

There Once Lived a Woman Who Tried to Kill Her Neighbor’s Baby by Ludmilla Petrushevskaya (translated from Russian by Keith Gessen and Anna Summers)

Gessen and Summers collected various stories from this renowned author and placed them into four categories: Songs of the Eastern Slavs, Allegories, Requiems, and Fairy Tales. But they all share dark, fable-esque perspectives on jealousy, repression, and revenge. I realized while reading this that I’d come to expect a certain interiority from short stories in general, and a focus on minute personal psychology. But Petrushevskaya’s stories are externalized; the outside world is treated as a nightmarish reflection on the grimness inside. There’s a sense that we’ve made the world in our image, and that the result is not pretty. This then raises the question of how you cope if what’s inside you doesn’t match the stories the world is feeding you, forcing characters to create or to find their own worlds. It’s fabulous in all senses of the word, and whether or not you speak Russian, I encourage you to look up some video interviews with this author, if only to appreciate her enviable hat collection.

book review: The Lost Village by Camilla Sten





THE LOST VILLAGE by Camilla Sten
translated from the Swedish by Alex Fleming
★★★☆☆
Minotaur Books, April 6, 2021



The Lost Village, originally published in Swedish as Staden in 2019, has a rather striking premise: in the 1950s, all 900 inhabitants of a remote Swedish town vanished without a trace.  There were only two people left behind – a newborn baby and a woman stoned to death in the town square.  In the present-day, documentary filmmaker Alice has been obsessed with this town since she was a child, as her grandmother’s entire family disappeared in the incident (her grandmother had moved away and was living in Stockholm at the time), and Alice decides to make an excursion to the town with a small filmmaking crew to uncover the truth about what happened.

And the premise is indeed the strongest thing about it – it kept me turning pages simply because the central mystery was so bizarre and fascinating.  There are dual timelines, past and present, with the present-day getting more of a focus, and I thought this balance was done well.  The tone was also fantastic – I wouldn’t necessarily describe this book as creepy or gothic in atmosphere, but there was this sort of gently thrumming sense of terror throughout the whole thing (not dissimilar from Midsommar which this is probably going to be compared to quite a bit).

That said, my first issue with this book cropped up within the first few pages, which is simply that the writing is quite amateurish.  I’m not sure whether the clunkiness can be ascribed to the original prose or to the translation (I’m inclined to think the former – my issues weren’t typically with word choice as much as poorly written exposition), but either way, it took some getting used to.

I also found the treatment of mental health to be rather cringe-inducing.  Mild spoilers: It’s pretty obvious one character’s possible ‘psychosis’ is set up to be a red herring in a rather half-baked attempt to provide a meta commentary about the stigmatization of mental illness, which… isn’t half as progressive as thriller writers seem to think it is.  For one thing, try to read this exchange without rolling your eyes into the back of your head:

“I saw them in your tent,” he goes on.  “In the toiletry bag, when I was borrowing your toothpaste.  Abilify.”  He pauses.  When he goes on, his voice is heavy.

“Abilify is an antipsychotic.  Right?  That’s what it said on the packaging.”

And for another thing… why?  We know mental illness is stigmatized.  We know.  This is not a particularly clever or incisive or subversive commentary on that fact.  Maybe as a writer you could try to come up with a more creative way to sow seeds of doubt into a group of friends than the dramatic reveal of – gasp – Abilify

Anyway, it’s hard to comment on the resolution without giving anything away, so I’ll stay vague.  I found some parts satisfying, some annoyingly convenient, and some just raised the question how did the initial investigation overlook this?

So on the whole, I just found this frustratingly uneven in execution.  I certainly did enjoy reading this more often than not, I’d just encourage you to lower your standards if it piques your interest.

Thank you to Netgalley and Minotaur Books for the advanced copy provided in exchange for an honest review.

book review: Catherine House by Elisabeth Thomas




CATHERINE HOUSE by Elisabeth Thomas
★★★☆☆
Custom House, May 2020




Whenever I read a book with a suspiciously low Goodreads rating I’m always all the more determined to love it – there’s something kind of fun about being in the minority in really ‘getting’ a book that goes over so many heads.  Sadly not the case here.  While I didn’t find this objectively terrible in any way, neither did I find it particularly special or pleasurable to read.

Following 18-year-old Ines who goes off to an experimental college, Catherine House subverts a lot of campus novel tropes.  Ines isn’t characterized by a passion for academia or a thirst for belonging or a love for her school – she’s socially and academically dispassionate to a fault.  Along with Ines’s lack of drive is a particularly conspicuous lack of atmosphere, and I think the Kazuo Ishiguro and Sarah Waters comparisons do this book a disservice if you go into it expecting a lush, indulgent, immersive setting.

While I did feel that Thomas did a great job of building suspense, to the point where I read this book in two sittings because there was something rather hypnotic about it, I also didn’t particularly care about what I was reading.  There’s a mystery at the heart of the school’s scientific research department, and I’m not sure whether the twist fell flat or whether I just was never invested enough to be moved by it.

Again, I don’t think this was bad or even unsuccessful in what it set out to do, and I can see it working perfectly for a certain type of reader.  Sadly it just wasn’t quite what I was looking for.

Thank you to Netgalley and Custom House for the advanced copy provided in exchange for an honest review.

book review: They Never Learn by Layne Fargo




THEY NEVER LEARN by Layne Fargo
★★★★★
Gallery Scout Press, October 13, 2020





They Never Learn was the most fun I’ve had with a book in ages.  It’s far from perfect (it notably leans into an obsession with the glam femme fatale in a way that wouldn’t have been out of place with mid-2000s feminist media), but I’m just going to leave that criticism at the door because I had such a damn good time reading this.

It follows Scarlett, a professor-turned-vigilante serial killer who spends her evenings tracking down and murdering men who have abused women.  We also follow a student at her university, Carly, a shy 18-year-old who becomes infatuated with her roommate.  Their chapters alternate, each a short, 3-5 page segment that confidently leaps from one perspective to the next, daring the reader to keep up.  This book is a page-turner, first and foremost, and it does a spectacular job at cohering into something that you can devour in a single sitting if you’re so inclined. 

This book is so clever, so unexpected, so deliciously indulgent.  Scarlett is a brilliant creation, and Carly’s chapters work to ground the novel and develop a character whose quotidian anxieties you can sympathize with, while Scarlett’s chapters amp up the stakes.  Highly recommended to all thriller fans, with the caveat of there being a significant trigger warning for sexual assault.

I won an advanced copy of this book in a Goodreads giveaway; thanks Gallery Scout Press.  All thoughts are my own.

book review: The Mercies by Kiran Millwood Hargrave





THE MERCIES by Kiran Millwood Hargrave
★★★★☆
Little, Brown and Co., 2020



This was a compelling read, a chilly and melancholy story about a fishing disaster and religious fanaticism in early 1600s Norway, buoyed by Millwood Hargrave’s elegant prose and deeply sympathetic characters.  The author’s attention to historical detail really shone through in her depiction of the village of Vardø, devastated by the loss of most of the male members of the community following a brutal storm; the surviving women then face yet more ruin following the arrival of Absalom Cornet, a Scottish commissioner tasked with spreading Christianity by witch-hunting suspected pagans in the community. 

My reading experience with this was all over the place – it was a 5 star book that dropped to somewhere around 2 or 3 stars by the end.  For me, this book felt like it was building and building toward an explosive climax, but instead sort of fizzled out – and I don’t just mean in the final scenes, which I know some readers took issue with; for me the entire final act sort of fell flat on its face.  I don’t want to spoil anything, but partway through a romance develops which didn’t materialize in a particularly interesting way for me – I thought it would have been a stronger and more interesting book without this element.  And while I of course loved the commentary on men fearing powerful women, at times this element felt a little too on the nose.  It’s not that Millwood Hargrave’s feminist agenda did a disservice to the book – certainly to the contrary – I just would have preferred a slightly defter touch.

That said, I did mostly enjoy reading this.  I think its biggest strength was the bleak, isolated atmosphere, which Millwood Hargrave captured to perfection.  (It reminded me quite a lot of Burial Rites in that regard.) I also thought Maren and Ursa were fantastic protagonists, each with a distinctive narrative voice. So ultimately, not a new favorite like I wanted it to be, but certainly worth a read.

Hannah and I have too many ARCs: an emergency readathon – 2020 edition

Last year around this time Hannah and I created a 2-person readathon to tackle some of our ARCs, and we are going to do the same this year, for the last two weeks of September.

I say it’s a 2-person readathon just because we are not planning on doing prompts or hashtags or anything that would accompany an Official readathon, but if you want to join us, by all means do! The only prompt is to read your ARCs.

I’m not going to do a set TBR because I know I won’t follow it, so I’m just going to show you all of my possibilities.

So without further ado… my ARCs. These are only the ones I’ve acquired since this time last year but I think this is more than enough to choose from.

So… what should I read?! Help!

EDIT: I’ll update this as I go.

READ:

Catherine House ★★★☆☆ | review
The Lost Village ★★★☆☆ | review

wrap up: August 2020

  1. The Bookwanderers by Anna James ★★★★★ | review to come
  2. Stop Kiss by Diana Son ★★★★☆
  3. Henry IV Part 1 by William Shakespeare ★★★☆☆
  4. Cymbeline by William Shakespeare ★★★★☆
  5. The Mercies by Kiran Millwood Hargrave ★★★★☆ | review
  6. The Perfect Nanny by Leila Slimani ★★★★☆
  7. Henry IV Part 2 by William Shakespeare ★★☆☆☆
  8. Out by Natsuo Kirino ★★★☆☆ | review

AUGUST TOTAL: 8
YEARLY TOTAL: 72

Favorite: The Bookwanderers
Least favorite: Henry IV Part 2

Other posts from August:

Life updates:

I got an iPhone 11 Pro and the quality of my cat photos has VASTLY IMPROVED. Follow on Twitter for daily cat spam.

Currently reading:

P.S. Follow me!  @ Twitter | Goodreads | Instagram | Letterboxd | Ko-fi

Project Shakespeare: month #6 wrap up

This is my first ever post with the block editor so… oy, bear with me, confused is an understatement.

Anyway, that’s right, we’ve apparently been doing this for SIX MONTHS (read: 4 calendar weeks x6 – not quite six months but close enough). You know the drill by now. Previous wrap ups here.

The Taming of the Shrew
★★★☆☆
my role: Lucentio

This is a play that I want to hate for obvious reasons, but the reality is that I don’t, at all. It’s lively and charming – the B plot with Tranio, Lucentio et al is nothing short of delightful – and I actually find it more (a) entertaining and (b) intellectually stimulating than the vast majority of the comedies that I’ve read. That said, the misogyny is, obviously, a hard pill to swallow, and I find it almost impossible to navigate that element in a contemporary production in a way that feels palatable without going against the text. (Incidentally, The Public Theatre’s recent radio play of Richard II includes an interview with a professor who mentions her opinion that we should halt all stagings of Othello, Merchant of Venice, and Shrew until we figure out a way to navigate their unfortunate optics, and the more I think about that comment the more I agree.)

There’s been a recent trend of playing Kate’s final speech (an infamous ode to patriarchy which, addressed to a group of other wives, literally contains the line “place your hands below your husband’s foot”) as sarcastic; implying that the shrew has not been tamed, she has merely learned to perform subservience. It’s a reading that doesn’t totally sit well with me – I just have to wonder, if Kate is performing, to what end? She’s still tied to a marriage with an abusive man, and if her spirit has been broken enough to even perform sincerity rather than continuing to obstinately refuse, to me that feels like a hollow triumph. Of course, watching the alternative, where the shrew has been tamed and Kate’s spirit is irrevocably broken, kind of feels like swallowing glass, especially in the context of a play which is otherwise jovial. It’s hard to walk away from this play feeling the sort of warmth you’re generally meant to experience while watching the comedies.

Unbeknownst to the rest of us, Project Shakespeare’s Kate and Petruchio were actually cooking up a third avenue: they choreographed it so that after Kate’s final speech and Petruchio’s final lines, Kate murders Petruchio. (Click that link to witness 10 people’s complete and utter shock unfold in real time, and scroll down to watch the full 30 second video.) Is it tonally incongruous, PERHAPS, but it was wonderfully cathartic when performed to an audience of feminists and staunch Petruchio haters. This was honestly the only acceptable way for this night to end.

Henry IV Part 1
★★★☆☆
my roles: Lady Percy, Vernon, Francis, Carrier, Welsh Lady

Probably my most noteworthy unpopular Shakespeare opinion thus far is that (with the exception of Richard II) I strongly dislike the Henriad. (Seriously side-eying everyone who promised me that Henries IV-V would be my favorite history plays, when they are all… solidly my least favorites. JUSTICE FOR KING JOHN.) This one gets a generous 3 stars because I find the conflict between Hal and Hotspur decently compelling, but otherwise… there is not nearly enough here to hold my interest. I also have to confess to zoning out every time Falstaff opens his mouth.

Cymbeline
★★★★☆
my roles: Queen, Guiderius, Lady, First Brother, First British Captain

I really love Cymbeline. I’m not sure I could argue that this is one of Shakespeare’s better plays – it’s a bit of a mess in the same way Pericles is a bit of a mess, which I adore it for – but god it’s entertaining. I’m weirdly charmed by the genre-hopping in his later plays. Also, this was one of my personal favorite Project Shakespeare performances. Even though it lasted three whole hours (it’s the third-longest Shakespeare play), I was weirdly sad when it ended. The ghost sequence is the hardest I’d laughed in ages.

Julius Caesar
★★★★★
my roles (first show): Calpurnia, Cinna, Second Citizen, Soothsayer, Second Commoner, Lucilius, Ligarius, Lepidus
my role (second show): Brutus

When I first read Julius Caesar earlier this summer, it quickly became one of my favorite plays; I’ve since read it a handful of times, watched three different productions, and now performed it twice, so… it’s been a whirlwind love affair. One of the reasons I love it so much is purely sentimental so let’s just get that one out of the way – I have never loved anything academically as much as I loved all four years of my high school Latin class, so part of what I love about Julius Caesar is simply that it continues the dialogue around a historical event that I first learned about in a context that I adored. But beyond that, I just think it’s a damn good play. The theme of human fallibility is one that I particularly gravitate toward – and I love the inherent ambiguity built into this play. Whether the assassination of Julius Caesar was ‘correct’ – morally or politically – is a question that has given historians pause for centuries, and what I love about this play is that it has no interest in answering that question. This isn’t a play about heroes and villains, it’s about people making impossible choices and suffering the consequences. And getting to play Brutus was a dream. What a role.

Next up: Henry IV Part 2 – solidly my least favorite play of the 25 I’ve read so far – and then I can be done with the Henriad ONCE AND FOR ALL (we’ve already done Henry V).