mini reviews #1: Wave, Mary Rose, Bluets, Another Brooklyn, Eurydice

This is something I’ve been wanting to do for a while, so, no time like the present.  I don’t always feel like writing multi-paragraph long reviews for every single book I read, but when my reviews are this short I don’t usually bother cross-posting them from Goodreads to WordPress.  So, I shall begin transferring them over here in a series of mini review posts.  Also, reminder that you’re welcome to add me on Goodreads!

15797917WAVE by Sonali Deraniyagala
★★★★☆
Knopf, 2013
date read: July 11, 2018

In Sonali Deraniyagala’s frank and candid memoir, she recounts the loss of her parents, husband, and two sons who were all killed in the 2004 tsunami in Sri Lanka. Wave is every bit as harrowing as you’d imagine, but it’s also refreshingly sincere and devoid of sensationalism – instead it rather beautifully captures one woman’s honest and occasionally ugly experience with grief. Although it’s at times a bit meandering and repetitive in execution it is utterly gripping from start to finish. There isn’t much hope or resolution here, but there is hardly a scarcity of gratitude or resilience.

36072356MARY ROSE by Geoffrey Girard
★★☆☆☆
Adaptive Books, April 2018
date read: June 29, 2018

This was… fine? I guess? I would not recommend listening to the audiobook. The narrator infuses it with a lot of melodrama and bad accents, and hearing the name ‘Mary Rose’ spoken aloud approximately eighty-five million times is grating. I don’t know. I just felt impatient listening to this. For the fact that about 95% of it was character development, none of the characters were particularly well developed. The 5% of actual story was fine, just not enough to really hold my interest. I’d like to read the JM Barrie play at some point though.

6798263BLUETS by Maggie Nelson
★★★☆☆
Wave Books, 2009
date read: June 22, 2018

Bluets had a lot of the same sharp wit and similar pithy observations that I enjoyed in The Argonauts but I think this one was just a bit too abstract for my tastes. I also didn’t do myself any favors by reading this in short bursts over the span of two weeks when I think Nelson’s writing best lends itself to a more immersive reading experience. Still enjoyed it, still looking forward to checking out her other works.

30064150ANOTHER BROOKLYN by Jacqueline Woodson
★★☆☆☆
Amistad, 2016
date read: June 8, 2018

I listened to this on audio and… got pretty much nothing out of it. The narrator did a good job, but I just never felt grounded enough in this story, which to me felt more like it wanted to be a slice of life/coming of age poetry collection than a novel. But at the same time I do understand why others have loved this – I think it comes down to whether or not you click with Woodson’s flowery style of prose.

 

5661021EURYDICE by Sarah Ruhl
★★★☆☆
Samuel French, originally published in 2003
date read: April 16, 2018

There’s an undeniable pathos at the heart of this play that I think is informed so strongly by Ruhl’s personal experiences it almost made me question the need for this to be disguised as Eurydice’s story. This felt more like I was reading a poetry collection than a play, which was fine, albeit not what I thought I’d signed up for. The climactic scene between Orpheus and Eurydice was the highlight for me, though clearly there was so much tenderness put into the relationship between Eurydice and her father. Ruhl’s dialogue is incisive and dreamlike all at once and this was a pleasure to read in many ways, but ultimately where it didn’t totally connect for me was that it didn’t feel grounded enough in its source material.

Have you guys read any of these?  Feel free to comment down below if you’d like to talk about any of them in more detail!

book review: The Argonauts by Maggie Nelson

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THE ARGONAUTS by Maggie Nelson
★★★★☆
Graywolf Press, 2015

I don’t know why it’s taken me this long to read Maggie Nelson, but I was starting to worry that The Argonauts couldn’t possibly live up to its extensive hype. I was also skeptical when this memoir quite literally opened with a paragraph about anal sex – I think I sighed and thought ‘oh, this is going to be one of those books.’ I feel like this is a category of book that both novels and memoirs can fall into: the ones that think sex is this shocking, scandalous thing, that want to prove to their reader how daring they are for graphically depicting such a ‘taboo’ subject, that mistake vulgarity for profundity and bravery, but which are written so awkwardly you just end up cringing.

And I can see where for some readers, The Argonauts might end up being that kind of book. But Nelson won me over. There is a searing honesty to her prose that’s an undeniable force in this memoir, and it’s hard to put it down once it sucks you in. Nelson’s sentence construction is striking, and her observations on love and sexuality are all poignant. While Nelson’s perspectives are often heavily rooted in academia, the personal, emotional slant never fades. This is also one of the most candid, unapologetic memoirs I think I’ve ever read – though it isn’t self-deprecating in tone, Nelson never spares herself from her own commentary and conclusions. It’s just refreshingly human.

I wouldn’t dream of attempting to level this against The Argonauts as any kind of objective criticism, but I still have to mention it to explain why I dropped the 5th star from my rating: I’m tired of motherhood books. It’s a subject that doesn’t particularly intrigue me to begin with, and I feel like I’ve been reading quite a few novels and memoirs lately that reflect on motherhood. I’m just tired of it. The parts of The Argonauts that focused on Nelson’s pregnancy were the least interesting to me, and I kept wishing that the focus would stay on her relationship with Harry. But that’s entirely a personal preference, and I fully intend to check out Nelson’s other works in the near future.